Sunday, October 22, 2017

Awards - Society of Wildlife Artists Annual Exhibition 2017

I went to see The Natural Eye 2017 on Friday. This is the annual exhibition of the Society of Wildlife Artists yesterday and I'll be writing my review of this splendid exhibition tomorrow.

You can view selected works in the exhibition:
  • on the Mall Galleries website - click the link above and scroll down. If you're interested in buying work via the website just complete form to the right of the artwork to enquire whether it is still available.
  • in the online catalogue on Issuu (which you can download if you have an Issuu account) - very useful for checking pricing if you intend submitting in the future exhibitions!
Society of Wildlife Artists 2017 - in the Threadneedle Space

Today I'm going to highlight those artists who received awards.   Links in the titles of the work are to that work on the Mall Galleries website or the website of the artist.

The exhibition was opened by David Lindo (aka The Urban Birder)- broadcaster, presenter on @BBCRadio4 Open Country, writer, author, talker and bird guider - who also presented the awards.


The Birdwatch Artist of the Year Award went to Jack Snipe by Nick Derry SWLA (Facebook / Twitter)

This prestigious award, held in association with the Society of Wildlife Artists (SWLA) and Swarovski Optik, is given to the artist whose work at the SWLA’s annual exhibition The Natural Eye is considered to be the most outstanding.

You can see more of the work Nick is exhibiting this year on his website.
Passionate about wildlife art since childhood, Nick took his first sketchbook out into the field when he was 13 years old in order to record his first Bittern. Since then, he has learned to draw and paint a bit better (most of the time), won a good few awards, assisted in illustrating several publications, become a member of the SWLA and sketched more than one Jack Snipe.
Birdwatch Artist of the Year Award 2017
Jack Snipe by Nick Derry SWLA

Mixed Media
£800 SOLD

The Terravesta Prize is a new prize this year sponsored by Terravesta, pioneers of sustainable energy from Miscanthus, who are also sponsoring the exhibition as a whole.  The artwork was chosen by William Cracroft-Eley the Chairman of Terravesta, who greatly enjoyed the exhibition and stayed for most of the day!

Flooded Washes by Carry Akroyd SWLA (Twitter) won this new prize and was selected because it was strong on habitat as well as wildlife - and excellent art of course!
A painter and printmaker, Carry Akroyd is drawn to the nature of the unlabelled countryside trying to survive alongside agribusiness
Carry is both a painter and printmaker and specialises in serigraph printing - which is the term used for screen printing when it is fine art rather than commercial art. However she also produces monoprints, etchings, linocuts and lithographs.   You can also see her art in Found in the Fields - an article on the BBC Wildlife Magazine which focuses on how she finds wildlife on the margins of agribusiness. She is also the President of the John Clare Society - who was also concerned about the impact of commercial agriculture on the countryside. She seems a very fitting choice for this new prize.

The Terravesta Prize
Flooded Washes by Carry Akroyd

serrigraph (edition of 6)
£885 SOLD (unframed - one still available)


The RSPB Award went to Dafila Scott SWLA for her pastel drawing of a Bittern over the fen which highlighted this wading bird in flight.

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Howard Hodgkin Portrait of the Artist - at Sotheby's

The collectable art and artifacts from Howard Hodgkin's estate are being auctioned on Tuesday at Sotheby's in London.


You can view the exhibition on Sunday and Monday - and it has some really lovely things in it.

You can also see the items online at the Sotheby's website for Howard Hodgkin Portrait of the Artist.

I must confess I love looking at what artists collect, even more so if they like the same things I like!  I love the fragments of Iznik pottery (I'm a big fan of the V&A's collection of Isnik tiles and pottery) but am somewhat bemused by the prices...

It's also intriguing how somebody known for his contemporary art should collect so much very traditional and decorative art.  The Indian pieces are outstanding!

Plus do read his article How to be an artist - it's a RECOMMENDED READ.

Friday, October 20, 2017

Art Schools in the UK - an Introduction

A new page on Art Business Info. for Artists
I'm developing a new section within Art Business Info. for Artists in relation to Practice - How to be a successful artist - Habits, Practices and Development.

One of the new pages in the sub-section that relates to Learning for Artists is about Art Schools in the UK
  • Are you interested in doing a fine art course?
  • Are you trying to decide which art school to apply to?
  • Do you know what your choice is if you want to do an undergraduate degree or postgraduate course in art and/or design?
Applications for a place to pursue an art degree in the 2018 academic year are now over.

However it's never too early to start looking if you're thinking of applying for a place in the future.

It starts with What is an Art Degree and then organises listings of the Art Schools, Colleges and Universities with a Fine Art Department / Campus by geography - as follows:

  • All about Art Schools and Colleges - which includes references to the various ranking tools used to grade performance of both the school and the students
  • Postgraduate (only) Art Schools in London
  • Undergraduate Art Schools in London
  • Other London Art Schools
  • Art Schools i
    • the South of England
    • the Midlands
    • the North of England
    • Wales; and 
    • Scotland



Thursday, October 19, 2017

Basquiat on the BBC and at the Barbican

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988) was a precocious and highly original talent - as a poet, artist and social commentator. He lived fast, painted faster, made a lot of money and died young, age 27, of a heroin overdose - just over 30 years ago. In May this year he achieved iconic art star status.

'Basquiat Boom for Real' Barbican
Photo Tristan Fewings | Getty Images | The Estate of Jean Michel Basquiat Artestar
The anniversary of his death has been marked by:
  • programmes on the BBC
  • an exhibition at the Barbican.
More about these below.



Basquiat at the BBC


There are a number of programmes and articles about Basquiat
and articles

"Basquiat - Rage to Riches"

I knew very little about Basquiat before watching the programme the Basquiat - Rags to Riches programme (link above) - but found it enormously interesting and a very good programme / bio about the artist. It's an interesting mix of the people who knew him really well as friends and those who knew him once he became absorbed by the art world - such as Larry Gagosian.
The recent Sotheby's auction of a Jean-Michel Basquiat Skull painting for over a hundred million dollars has catapulted this Brooklyn-born artist into the top tier of the international art market, joining the ranks of Picasso, de Kooning and Francis Bacon. This film tells Jean-Michel's story through exclusive interviews with his two sisters Lisane and Jeanine, who have never before agreed to be interviewed for a TV documentary. With striking candour, Basquiat's art dealers - including Larry Gagosian, Mary Boone and Bruno Bischofberger - as well as his most intimate friends, lovers and fellow artists, expose the cash, the drugs and the pernicious racism which Basquiat confronted on a daily basis. As historical tableaux, visual diaries of defiance or surfaces covered with hidden meanings, Basquiat's art remains the beating heart of this story.

Basquiat at the Barbican: "Basquiat: Boom for Real"

The exhibition at the Barbican opened on 21 September 2017 and it continues until 28 January 2018. I expect it will be very busy over Christmas/New Year! (Note the visitors info below)


'Basquiat Boom for Real' Barbican
Photo Tristan Fewings | Getty Images | The Estate of Jean Michel Basquiat Artestar

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Tim Storrier wins richest portrait prize in the world

WINNER OF THE DOUG MORAN PORTRAIT PRIZE
The Lunar Savant (portrait of McLean Edwards)
by Tim Storrier
acrylic on linen
The Lunar Savant (portrait of McLean Edwards) by Tim Storrier has just won the First Prize in the Doug Moran Portrait Prize - worth $AUD 150,000 

It's the richest portrait prize in the world[Note: Just to give some sense of perspective, according to Google, as of today, $AUD 150,000 equates to £89,160 in the UK; €99,910 in Europe  and $117,525 in the USA]

However the BIG story is the backstory about how the portrait came to be entered for the competition in the first place - which makes for fascinating reading. I'm guessing the sentiments expressed will be ones that many artists will have known at some point in their career.

    About the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize


    Founded in 1988, the aim of the prize over the last 29 years has been to encourage
    both excellence and creativity in contemporary Australian portraiture by asking artists to interpret the look and personality of a chosen sitter, either unknown or well known.
    The competition is only open to:
    • Australian citizens or 
    • an artist legally resident in Australia for the 12 months preceding the entries close date
    The judges of this year's competition were:
    • Daniel Thomas AM - an art historian and curator, who was once 
      • chief curator at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, 
      • then Senior Curator of Australian Art at the National Gallery of Australia and, 
      • from 1984 to 1990, Director of the Art Gallery of South Australia
    • Wendy Sharpe - an Australian artist who has won an awful lot of awards 
    • Greta Moran - a founding Director of the Moran Arts Foundation which she established with her late husband Doug Moran in 1988. 

    First Prize


    Tim Storrier's portrait of his friend the artist McLean Edwards is to my mind the absolute stand out portrait amongst the finalists - it's head and shoulders above the others - in more ways than one. (notwithstanding the fact the finalists included a self-portrait by McLean Edwards).
    Standing almost two metres tall, the portrait is one of the largest in the competition and certainly one of the most beautiful and arresting, depicting a disheveled-looking Edwards in a stark, mystical night landscape with a cigarette dangling loosely from one hand, a bemused look on his ruddy face and one shoe noticeably absent.Doug Moran Art Prize Won by a Portrait Rejected by the Archibald | Jane Albery, Broadsheet Melbourne
    Judge Daniel Thomas described the portrait as one that
    “went outside his personal mythology and produced an affectionate, teasing, ‘friendship painting’ of a wild fellow artist”.
    Interestingly, according to the Sydney Morning Herald
    • this is the first time Tim Storrier has entered the Doug Moran Portrait Prize competition. 
    • the portrait was "screened out" by the the judges of the Art Gallery of NSW (presumably in relation to the Archibald Prize)
    On collecting his prize money Storrier apparently commented as follows
    "That picture should have been really called Lazarus, because the judges of the Art Gallery of NSW in their wisdom screened it out; it did not make the cut..... It's interesting isn't it? It's two different institutions with two different value systems at work." Tim Storrier quoted in the Sydney Morning Herald
    Storrier was also in the news earlier this year for blasting the choice of winner for The Archibald Prize - see John Olsen and Tim Storrier blast judges of Archibald Prize dailytelegraph.com.au - they accused the judges of picking a "bland" portrait. He reiterated his criticism that the board of the Art Gallery of NSW had been taken over "by a postmodernist cabal" driven by fashion and political caution. in the interview he gave to the Sydney Morning Herald.

    That commentary makes more sense now it turns out that even pre-eminent portrait painters can feel very aggrieved about how selections are made for prestigious competitions!
    “It’s just amazing how a limping dog can end up winning a race, isn’t it?”Tim Storrier on his Doug Moran win after being rejected for The Archibald
    Storrier has very definitely for both street cred and a track record as both a portrait painter and winner of major awards.
    • He has won the Sulman Prize twice with 
      • 1968: a painting of a motorbike accident in the outback (Suzy 350) when he was 19 years of age
      • 1984: a painting called The Burn
    • He's a previous winner of The Archibald (Portrait) Prize with his faceless painting of The histrionic wayfarer (after Bosch(see my previous post Tim Storrier wins the $75,000 Archibald Prize 2012).
    • He then went on to win the Packing Room Prize in 2014 for his portrait of 'Sir Les Patterson' one of the messier inventions of John Barry Humphries, AO, CBE - Australian comedian, satirist, artist, and author.
    His work is also included in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York and all major Australian art museums.
    I just wish he'd have a shot at the BP Portrait Award so I could get to see one of his portraits - as they are always fascinating if not a total conundrum dressed up as a portrait.

    You can see more of Storrier's portraits/artworks on his website. This is a video about him.



    You can read about McLean edwards perspective on the portrait and the win by his friend in
    Head to head — Tim Storrier v McLean Edwards in Australia’s richest art prize

    The Finalists

    30 portraits made it through to the Finals of the Doug Moran Prize. (I like the fact every finalist wins $AUD 1,000).
    This is a very short video about the judging



    The Exhibition

    The Doug Moran Portrait Prize Exhibition opens tomorrow
    • Dates: 19 October to 17 December 2017
    • Venue: Juniper Hall, 250 Oxford Street, Paddington in Sydney.
    • Hours: Open Thursday to Sunday 10am to 4pm
    • Admission: Free
    The Juniper Hall venue is a former gin distillery in Paddington and the oldest building in Sydney, which was fully restored in 1988 and bought by the Moran Foundation in 2012 from the National Trust. It's used as an art gallery.

    Previous Winners

    On this page of the website you can see images of the previous winners and finalists between 2009 and 2016

    Reference: